Harvest Moon
Image by SugaShane via Flickr

Summer’s clearly past its halfway point, but that doesn’t mean you should feel down about yet another Monday working its way into your soul and beating it down with a blunt and sometimes spiky object. As always, Overly Positive is here to lift up your spirits with a bit of good news:

-Forty Years After the First Moon Landing, and the Games That Love it (the Toronto Star, via Kotaku): “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”. Those were the words uttered by those that first set foot on lunar land four decades ago. Kotaku’s dug up something written by a newspaper that talks about games that have moon references, or in some cases, whole levels. Yep, forty years ago, geek fantasies of traveling in space just gota little bit more feasible, so don’t give up hope – wet dreams about being a Jedi could be just around the corner.

-New Harry Potter Movie Launches, Sets New Opening Record of $396.7 Million (via MSN): Some people might think that Harry’s lost a bit of his magic over the years, but the new movie, “The Half-Blood Prince”, seemed to cut into that little notion just a touch – to the tune of nearly four hundred million, that is. The movie had the sixth biggest opening for a five day period in the US and Canada, and the previous record holder, Spider-Man 3, ended up making over nine hundred big ones. Will Harry Potter break a billion? We’ll see, but all indications look good.

-Star Fox Sequel on the way – Developed by Fans (via The Escapist): Those of you who yearn for the days of third-person space shooters will be happy to know that fans of the Star Fox series have decided to develop their own sequel to the series. It’s unclear whether this is going to be legally blocked in any way, but the game, titled Shadows of Lylat, will feature different Arwing types as well as “familiar faces” from the previous games. Sure, Star Fox is no Halo, but it has its own niche of fans and is firmly planted in a genre that could use more entries.

-DRM is Officially Dead, Says the RIAA (Torrentfreak, via Digg): The Recording Industry Association of America, the enemy of free-wheeling, music-downloading people everywhere since they took on Napster, appears to have come out to say “my bad”. Digital Rights Management, or DRM, has been a  constant pain point for consumers both legitimate and illegitimate, and segments of the industry who agree, most notably Apple, have provided DRM-free alternatives that have paid in dividends. So I suppose it’s no surprise when Jonathan Lamy, chief spokesperson for the RIAA, has to back down and declare DRM “dead” in the face of, well, empirical evidence and cold, hard cash. A victory for DRM fighters everywhere, indeed.

That’s all for now – now go forth, and enjoy your DRM-free, magic wand-less, non-Arwing commute – and don’t forget to buy up some of that lunar land if you can!

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